Area Maze

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Visit all four corners and the center while alternating the area of the tile you are on. You go from a larger tile to a smaller to a larger and so on.

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To start, click a corner or the center. These are tiles with an area of four unit squares. A token appears on the clicked position. To move the token, click directly to the north, south, east, or west of the last click. You can either move inside the tile you are on or to an adjacent tile.

You cannot move to an adjacent tile if it has the same area as the current tile. If the area of the tile you move to is smaller, then on the next move you must move to a tile with a larger area, and vice versa.

You win if you have visited all corners and the center.

You could also try to find the solution with the least number of moves.

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Contributed by: Karl Scherer (February 2014)
Open content licensed under CC BY-NC-SA


Snapshots


Details

History

This game and a few similar ones were previously published as the Zillions game "A-Maze III" by the author.

An area-maze (or a-maze for short) is a maze where you step from tile to tile, observing carefully the area of the tile you are standing on. The relative size of the area has to alternate: larger, smaller, larger, smaller, etc.

The world experts on mazes have confirmed that a-mazes are a totally new class of mazes. They were discovered on August 15, 1999 in London by the author while looking at the woodwork of a Chinese coffee table. He attends the "International Puzzle Party", a yearly convention of puzzle enthusiasts.

Due to its novelty, there exists no literature at all on a-mazes. Many related problems might be waiting to be discovered!



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