9722

Nowhere-Neat Tilings of the Plane, Part 2

If no two tiles in a (polygonal) tiling have a full side in common, the tiling is called nowhere-neat. The challenge is to find all such tilings of the plane using only one or two prototiles.
This Demonstration displays all known nowhere-neat tilings of the plane on the isometric (60 degree) grid and a few interesting nowhere-neat tilings of the plane that fit neither on the orthogonal nor on the isometric grid.
The previous Demonstration on nowhere-neat tilings of the plane dealt with tilings that fit on the orthogonal grid (i.e. all the vertices have integral coordinates).

SNAPSHOTS

  • [Snapshot]
  • [Snapshot]
  • [Snapshot]

DETAILS

GEOMANTRA
Artifacts in black and white
or in any coloured light,
patterns knit by maddest hatters
defy the use of words and letters.
Design or game or maths as art?
I really don't know where to start
and how to tell you what I see,
it's mystic, mantra-like to me,
it's puzzling, difficult and vexing,
complex, astounding and perplexing.
And still—it could be after all
just your neighbour's bathroom wall.
Introduction
All known nowhere-neat tilings of the plane on the orthogonal grid have been shown in the previous Demonstration "Nowhere-Neat Tilings of the Plane" by the same author.
The tilings presented here are the ones that do not fit onto an integral orthogonal grid. They either fit onto an isometric (60-degree) grid or are tilings that contain at least some vertices that have more irregular placement.
There are 146 tilings presented here. Some of them are quite hard to find, such as the solutions for the cases and . Surely some discoveries are still waiting to be made!
You can edit the given tilings or create your own. For this purpose 10 identical tilings "Test1", …, "Test10" are listed at the end of the "tiling" drop-down menu, which you are invited to overwrite with your own creations.
While the topic of this Demonstration is nowhere-neat tilings, this Demonstration can be used to create any other tilings and hence is a useful tool for exploring tilings of the plane in general. The system does not check whether a tiling is indeed nowhere-neat.
Naming of tilings
Nowhere-neat tilings on the isometric grid are named NN2-…. All other nowhere-neat tilings presented in this Demonstration (some on the orthogonal grid, some more irregular) are named NN3-…. The tilings in the previous Demonstration were named NN-….
Scientific results (some deeper theorems follow later)
For the following sets of one or two polygonal prototiles, nowhere-neat tilings of the plane have been found:
(The numbers denote the number of sides of the polygons.)
Note that this is a new and improved list due to the latest findings!
Table of solutions published in both Demonstrations.
Let stand for the phrase "one can easily see how to find solutions for all…".
From tiling and
From tiling
From tiling
From tiling and
From tiling (and also from , , )
From tiling and
From tiling and
Apart from tilings of the type there seems to be no solution for if .
In general, it is not known for which there is a nowhere-neat tiling of the plane with two prototiles. (See the existence theorem later.)
While this Demonstration aims to display all known nowhere-neat tilings of the plane on the isometric grid, some tilings have been omitted since they are straightforward modifications of tilings that were presented already on the orthogonal grid.
All tilings are by the author. For further information, see his book New Mosaics, referenced below, or the Zillions games "Floor Tilings" and "Floor Tilings II". The book contains a lot of irregular solutions that are not presented in this Demonstration.
Control: "select"
The options "<<", "<", ">", and ">>" select the first, previous, next, and last stored tiling, respectively.
Control: "do"
Reset: Click "default" to restore the current tiling to its default. All editing information of this tiling will be lost.
Copy: Click "copy" to mark the current tiling. It will be used later by the "paste" option.
Paste: Click "paste" to paste the marked tiling to the current position, thereby replacing the current tiling.
Control: "point grid"
The "point grid" control contains four on/off buttons:
• The first button makes the integral lattice grid visible/invisible.
• The second button toggles between the ortho(gonal) grid and the iso(metric) grid. Note that changing the grid type can distort an existing tiling since the tiling data is based on counting grid increments: the unit of height in the orthogonal grid is 1, but in the isometric grid it is . That is why the ortho/iso selection is always stored together with the tilings.
• The third button controls whether the grid is placed on top of or underneath the tiling.
• The fourth button controls whether the currently edited vertex should snap to the grid. The "snap" setting is stored with the tilings.
Control: "grid of tiles"
The tilings are constructed as a union of "tile grids". For each tile grid, a prototile is specified that is then copied to a grid of positions. All copies will carry the same color. In the given examples the grids never overlap. See below to find out how the grid of positions is specified.
The system stores the grid specifications rather than the data for each tile. Hence for each display the system re-creates the tiling from the stored sets of its prototiles and the associated grid specifications.
Control: "zoom"
This control comes in handy when you create and edit the prototile of the current grid of tiles. When you have zoomed in, you can shift the zoom window with the four arrow buttons next to the zoom options.
Control: "show"
Clicking the option "part+" will display only the selected grid of tiles (or—if group is greater than 0—the selected group of tile grids, starting with the current one). The current tile grid can then be edited. Click the "save" button in the "action" setter bar to store the edited tile grid.
Clicking the option "combined" will enter the edit mode and display the stored tiling with the edited grid of tiles (combining the new part with the old parts). The old grid of tiles with the same number will not be shown. Click the "save" button in the "action" setter bar to store the edited tile grid.
Clicking the option "stored tiling" will display the stored tiling, ignoring the editing of the current tile grid. While "stored tiling" is selected the edit mode is switched off; hence you cannot use any of the "action" options.
If the show option "stored tiling" is active, selecting a new tile grid (or changing any other tile grid settings) will automatically switch to the option "combined" and start the edit mode.
Control: "action"
Store: Click "save" to store your edited tile grid.
Double range: Click "dbl+" to create a copy of the current tile grid or a group of tile grids. The current grid will be saved first. The new grid(s) will be inserted at the next position(s) after the old group of tile grids. All the following entries will be renumbered. The system will update the tile grid number to display the number of the new tile grid. The new "current" grid will be the first grid of the newly copied set.
Reset: Click "r" to reset the specifications of the currently selected tile grid to the last stored values ("color", "tiles from...to", "t displ", "rows from...to", "r displ").
Default range: Click "d+" to reset to default the specifications of the current grid and the next grids, the total number being given by the "group" selection. All editing information of these tile grids will be lost.
Delete range: Clicking "del+" will delete the current tile grid and also a few other tile grids with higher numbers (the number of elements in this group is given by the "group" drop-down menu). For technical reasons the last grid of a tiling cannot be deleted, hence "del+" does not work if all tile grids would be deleted.
Shuffle tile grids: Clicking option "1+" will shift a group of tile grids, beginning with the current one, to the start of the queue. This is a simple tool to shuffle the tile grids. The number of tile grids in the group is given by the "group" selection.
Color selection
Clicking a color starts the edit mode (if it is not yet active).
For purely aesthetic reasons, the colors in the given tilings have been chosen so that no two adjacent tiles carry the same color. Of course having adjacent tiles always of different colors often means that more grids are necessary for the definition of the tiling.
For the condition of the tiling being nowhere-neat the choice of colors is irrelevant.
Controls: specification of grid positions
Clicking a specification of grid positions will start the edit mode (if it is not yet active).
A grid of positions (for the copies of the given prototile) is specified as follows:
The tile displacements ("t displ") show how far the next tile is from the previous tile in the same row of tiles ("h": horizontal displacement; "v": vertical displacement).
The "from" and "to" entries define where the row starts and ends. (If a row extends beyond the screen frame, it usually means that it should go on forever.)
The row displacements ("r displ") show the displacement between one row and the next. Again, the "from" and "to" entries define how many rows there are to be displayed.
Note that the prototile itself and the row containing the prototile have the number 0, since the entries "from" and "to" define the number of steps there are between the start and end of the row!
Some tilings contain "tile grids" that consist only of one tile, a few tiles, or a single row of tiles.
After each position control there is a checkbox. Clicking it (in edit mode) will set the two associated controls to zero (after putting them in temporary storage). If you click it when both controls are zero, then the values will be restored from temporary storage.
Changing any tile grid parameter automatically invokes the edit mode (if it is not active already).
Editing the prototile
Start the edit mode (for example by selecting the "show" control "part+" or the "show" control "combined"). You will see a polygon whose vertices are marked by large dots. This is the "prototile" of your tile grid.
The prototile determines what all the tiles in the grid will look like. Click the "color" setter bar to change the color of the prototile. Move the vertices to change the shape of the prototile. If you have this selected, the vertices of your prototile will snap to the selected grid.
You can add a vertex with Alt-click in Windows or Option-click in Mac OS.
After moving the cursor to a marked vertex, you can delete a vertex (again with Alt-click or Option-click).
Control: "group"
Here you decide how large the group of tile grids is that you want to manipulate simultaneously. The group of tile grids begins with the current one.
All controls that carry a plus sign "+" are able to affect a whole group of tile grids at once. These are: show part ("part+"), save from-to parameters ("=+"), double ("dbl+"), default ("d+"), delete ("del+"), move to first in row ("1+"), all shift and mirror controls for prototiles ("", "", "", "", "", ""), rotation ("rotation+"), and drag ("drag+"). Note that the reset option (button "r" in the "action" setter bar) only applies to the current tiling grid, but not for groups of tiling grids.
Control: rotate prototile or prototile group
Select a rotation from the drop-down menu, then activate it by clicking the checkbox next to it. You can click the checkbox several times in a row (but give the system time to react in between).
If "group" > 1 is selected, any rotation will affect a group of tile grids, beginning with the current one. This way you can rotate groups of prototiles around the same point. (Note that this does not rotate the resulting tiling!) All changes will be immediately saved, so you do not have to click the "save" button afterward.
If "pivot" > 0 is selected, the rotation will be around the selected vertex; otherwise the group will rotate around the center of the group. If "use origin" is selected, the origin is used as the fixed point for the rotation.
Control: resize prototile or prototile group
Set the "resize+" slider to the desired value and then click the checkbox next to it. The current tile will be enlarged by the amount given by the "resize+" slider. If "pivot" > 0 is selected, the fixed point of the resizing will be the selected vertex; otherwise the fixed point will be the center of the prototile.
If "group" > 0 is selected, resizing will affect a group of tile grids, beginning with the current one. All changes will be immediately saved, so you do not have to click the "save" button afterward.
If "pivot" > 0 is selected, the fixed point of the resizing will be the selected vertex; otherwise the fixed point will be the center of the prototile. If "use origin" is selected, the origin is used as the fixed point for resizing.
Control: process prototile or prototile group
The options of the setter bar allow you flip the prototile horizontally ("") or vertically ("") or shift it in one of four directions ("", "", "", "").
If "group" > 1 is selected, the shift and mirror operations will affect a group of tile grids, beginning with the current one. All changes will be immediately saved, so you do not have to click the "save" button afterward.
If "pivot" > 0 is selected, the fixed point of the mirroring will be the selected vertex; otherwise the fixed point will be the center of the group of prototiles. If "use origin" is selected, the axes are used for mirroring.
Control: drag prototile or prototile group
Clicking the "drag+" button starts a drag mode, which then stays active until the button is clicked again. In drag mode the whole prototile moves anywhere you want it. Just click the target position or drag a vertex. If "pivot" = 0, the closest vertex will be moved to the designated position. Otherwise the selected vertex will be moved to the designated position.
If "group" > 1 is selected, the drag operation will affect a group of tile grids, beginning with the current one. All changes will be immediately saved, so you do not have to click the "save" button afterward.
Control: "pivot"
Here you can select a pivot (a handle) for your rotation, flip, and drag operations. Moving the slider will cause one of the prototile's vertices to turn gray. This vertex will then be used by the rotate, flip, and drag processes mentioned above.
If "pivot" = 0 (which is the default), then the axes and their intersection point will be used for the rotate and flip processes. If "use origin" is selected, the origin is used as the fixed point for the rotations and mirroring.
Note
If many polygons are displayed, the system can be slow to react to your input. If a click does not have an effect, click another button first (click a neutral "-" button), then go back to your previous click. Give the system time to react!
Some deeper mathematical results
The following theorems are taken from the author's book New Mosaics.
The existence theorem for nowhere-neat tilings
In general, it is not known whether a nowhere-neat tiling of type exists for a given pair of natural numbers, even if we allow any number of prototiles. Hence there is no general existence theorem for nowhere-neat tilings. However, one can prove a less general version stating that for any natural numbers there are nowhere-neat tilings of the plane of types , , and . In detail:
Given numbers , the following hold (if any number of prototiles is allowed per type):
a. There are nowhere-neat tilings of the plane of types , , and .
b. For the minimum number of prototiles, these are the upper bounds:

and especially: .

and especially: .

and especially: .
The extension theorem for nowhere-neat tilings
Let be a finite nowhere-neat tiling that is totally surrounded by a polyline (i.e. by an outline of a polygon) without touching it. Then can be extended to a nowhere-neat tiling of . The extension can be chosen to consist only of triangles and quadrilaterals.
Corollaries
Any nowhere-neat tiling can be extended to a nowhere-neat tiling of the whole plane.
For any polygon there is a nowhere-neat tiling of a square that contains as one of its tiles.
For any polygon there is a nowhere-neat tiling of the plane that contains as one of its tiles.
References
The second half of the book New Mosaics, privately published 1997 by the same author, investigates the topic of nowhere-neat tilings in detail.
The Zillions games "Floor Tilings" and "Floor Tilings II" by the same author deal with the same topic. "Floor Tilings" deals with nowhere-neat tilings of the plane on the orthogonal grid, while "Floor Tilings II" deals with nowhere-neat tilings of the plane on the isometric grid.
    • Share:

Embed Interactive Demonstration New!

Just copy and paste this snippet of JavaScript code into your website or blog to put the live Demonstration on your site. More details »

Files require Wolfram CDF Player or Mathematica.









 
RELATED RESOURCES
Mathematica »
The #1 tool for creating Demonstrations
and anything technical.
Wolfram|Alpha »
Explore anything with the first
computational knowledge engine.
MathWorld »
The web's most extensive
mathematics resource.
Course Assistant Apps »
An app for every course—
right in the palm of your hand.
Wolfram Blog »
Read our views on math,
science, and technology.
Computable Document Format »
The format that makes Demonstrations
(and any information) easy to share and
interact with.
STEM Initiative »
Programs & resources for
educators, schools & students.
Computerbasedmath.org »
Join the initiative for modernizing
math education.
Step-by-step Solutions »
Walk through homework problems one step at a time, with hints to help along the way.
Wolfram Problem Generator »
Unlimited random practice problems and answers with built-in Step-by-step solutions. Practice online or make a printable study sheet.
Wolfram Language »
Knowledge-based programming for everyone.
Powered by Wolfram Mathematica © 2014 Wolfram Demonstrations Project & Contributors  |  Terms of Use  |  Privacy Policy  |  RSS Give us your feedback
Note: To run this Demonstration you need Mathematica 7+ or the free Mathematica Player 7EX
Download or upgrade to Mathematica Player 7EX
I already have Mathematica Player or Mathematica 7+